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Monday, 07 January 2008

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Sridhar

I can think of three reasons for this.

1. When telephones were introduced, people interacted with them based on a mixture of auditory and visual cues. Maybe, it was considered then, to wait till you heard the second ring to make sure that you were getting a call, because a complete ring would mean that somebody was definitely calling you (that was the normal association, as opposed to a partial ring). It had a finality/ decisiveness to it.
2. Also, it might have been the case that, people thought that if interrupted, the call might not come through.
3. Finally, a matter of etiquette, unnatural abrupt tone "cutting", unpleasant.

All these could just have continued, because of no reinforcement to act otherwise. A saving of 4-5 seconds, even over a large population might not warrant the cognitive change required to change the behavior. There are much worse things out there that result in delays.

Rental

Hi Merry Christmas and Happy New Year

Rental

Happy New Year! Happiness and success in 2011.

Hotjobs

With the new 2011. Year! Congratulations.

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worth reading twice

  • Adam Greenfield: Everyware: The Dawning Age of Ubiquitous Computing

    Adam Greenfield: Everyware: The Dawning Age of Ubiquitous Computing
    An excellent overview of the human concerns implicated by the coming (and already here) pervasive computing / ambient informatics. Designers need to read this. (****)

  • David Allen: Getting Things Done: The Art of Stress-Free Productivity

    David Allen: Getting Things Done: The Art of Stress-Free Productivity
    I've read 100 "time management" books. This is the only one I recommend. Read it. I'm implementing the entire book, but it's easy to find gold nuggets which, implemented in isolation, will raise your productivity. The reason is that these techniques accept, rather than fight, the nature of our minds and our world. Consider this: You can't manage time at all. You get exactly 24 hours each day, during which you can manage actions. Relatedly, you don't manage priorities — you have them. It is counterproductive to pretend your priorities are other than what they are. (*****)

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