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Wednesday, 16 May 2007

Comments

Sonia Sanchez

I use the position of the end of my bookmark to remember where I stopped. Before bookmarks came into my life, I used to use a pencil/ pen/ highlighter and put a ---x--- at the line/ paragraph (mostly paragraph unless the book was so boring that I had to leave it in the middle of a line!) that I had stopped at.

Yeah, the multiple books is something I have for quite a while now. I lack the patience to go through a single book without needing to context switch. Usually the genres of the books I read at a time are different - if one is advertising, the other is pure fiction novel, while another is a fiction that teaches you something. One can argue that any kind of fiction teaches you something or the other... if nothing it surely expands your imagination. True.

As for leaving markers on multiple chapters in a book, I do that for technical books. That is my way of forcing myself to go through at least parts I am curious about before I give up on it. None of the other books suffer from this condition for me.

Giving up on a book midway... hmmm... done that a zillion times for technical books, very few non technical.

- Sonia

sunil

Nice suggestions. I never realized that there is anything wrong with focusing on finishing a book! It seems so natural. I never tried reading several books at a time.
I am afraid I would loose track of everything.
After reading this article I intend to try it.

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worth reading twice

  • Adam Greenfield: Everyware: The Dawning Age of Ubiquitous Computing

    Adam Greenfield: Everyware: The Dawning Age of Ubiquitous Computing
    An excellent overview of the human concerns implicated by the coming (and already here) pervasive computing / ambient informatics. Designers need to read this. (****)

  • David Allen: Getting Things Done: The Art of Stress-Free Productivity

    David Allen: Getting Things Done: The Art of Stress-Free Productivity
    I've read 100 "time management" books. This is the only one I recommend. Read it. I'm implementing the entire book, but it's easy to find gold nuggets which, implemented in isolation, will raise your productivity. The reason is that these techniques accept, rather than fight, the nature of our minds and our world. Consider this: You can't manage time at all. You get exactly 24 hours each day, during which you can manage actions. Relatedly, you don't manage priorities — you have them. It is counterproductive to pretend your priorities are other than what they are. (*****)

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